Stop making a scene
Amazing artwork
It makes me think - are we all made like this? (not literally)

Amazing artwork

It makes me think - are we all made like this? (not literally)

Didn’t you understand that I was melancholy?
Moomintroll, from the book Moominland Midwinter (via allthingsmoomin)
my bloody mind

Beautiful prose that captures the crazy fantasies we have in response to criticism. 

Men are brought up to make pronouncements and have ideas; women are brought up to listen, chat, congratulate, offer support, and listen some more. 

Men are brought up to make pronouncements and have ideas; women are brought up to listen, chat, congratulate, offer support, and listen some more. 

warrior-scribe:

Instagram selfie of the #con10 Demystifying Social Media panel. Meta!

warrior-scribe:

Instagram selfie of the #con10 Demystifying Social Media panel. Meta!

anneursu:

Right now, children’s literature is seeing an intense flare-up in the ongoing conversation about the diversity crisis in children’s books. While this conversation has been going on for decades, now social media has given the people having it megaphones, and they are using them to brilliant ends….

I really wish people who know little or nothing about YA literature would stop writing about YA literature. just go and read something by Francesca Lia Block, Melina Marchetta, Malorie Blackman, Ambelin Kwaymullina, Rainbow Rowell…

artandhumanrights:

"Rise Like a Phoenix", 2014, Conchita Wurst (b. 1988)
Those who know me will know that I would gladly leap at the opportunity to include Eurovision in this blog. Happily, that time has come!
After a tight tussle with the Netherlands (deservedly with its Fleetwood Mac country), Sweden (sorry, boring!), and, surprisingly (though they did fall away), Armenia and Hungary, Austrian drag queen Conchita Wurst eventually blitzed the field with the James Bond theme-like “Rise Like a Phoenix”. (though really, Italy and Switzerland deserved many more votes!)
The creation of singer Tom Neuwirth, it was expected that Conchita would do well but that social conservatism would cruel her chances of victory. Certainly, Israeli transgender Dana International won in 1998, but before many of the more conservative Eastern European States joined the competition.
Well, perish the thought - the immaculately bearded Conchita won by over 50 points! And, despite the grimly homophobic response from Russian politicians, only four countries failed to deliver votes for Austria (Belarus, Armenia, Poland and San Marino). Conchita actually came third in the popular votes in Russia and Azerbaijan (dragged down to sixth and tenth, respectively, by the “expert” juries). She also garnered big points from countries such as Ukraine (8 point), Romania (8 points) and Georgia (10 points, where the expert jury votes failed), to bolster the predictable support from Western Europe.
Conchita’s win is a slap in the face for rising official homophobia, such as Russia’s appalling “gay propaganda laws”. In any case, Russia is smarting from the booing of its votes (though that was scarcely deserved for its 17 year old twin representatives, despite the silly connected hair and see-saw). Seems that annexation of parts of neighbouring countries does not go down well with the Eurovision crowd (though, disgracefully, it also led to the disqualification of Georgia in 2009). Ukraine, by the way, beat Russia by 24 points (and that hamster wheel is, um, clearly an excellent metaphor for the ongoing crisis). Russia came seventh, but its high position is virtually assured by a large ex-pat community in parts of Europe, and it received unusually low votes from Ukraine (4 points), Latvia (2 points) and Estonia (1 point). 
In a victory for tolerance, fun and opposition to bigotry, Conchita defiantly declared in victory that “we are united and we are unstoppable”. Indeed!

I love Conchita <3

artandhumanrights:

"Rise Like a Phoenix", 2014, Conchita Wurst (b. 1988)

Those who know me will know that I would gladly leap at the opportunity to include Eurovision in this blog. Happily, that time has come!

After a tight tussle with the Netherlands (deservedly with its Fleetwood Mac country), Sweden (sorry, boring!), and, surprisingly (though they did fall away), Armenia and Hungary, Austrian drag queen Conchita Wurst eventually blitzed the field with the James Bond theme-like “Rise Like a Phoenix”. (though really, Italy and Switzerland deserved many more votes!)

The creation of singer Tom Neuwirth, it was expected that Conchita would do well but that social conservatism would cruel her chances of victory. Certainly, Israeli transgender Dana International won in 1998, but before many of the more conservative Eastern European States joined the competition.

Well, perish the thought - the immaculately bearded Conchita won by over 50 points! And, despite the grimly homophobic response from Russian politicians, only four countries failed to deliver votes for Austria (Belarus, Armenia, Poland and San Marino). Conchita actually came third in the popular votes in Russia and Azerbaijan (dragged down to sixth and tenth, respectively, by the “expert” juries). She also garnered big points from countries such as Ukraine (8 point), Romania (8 points) and Georgia (10 points, where the expert jury votes failed), to bolster the predictable support from Western Europe.

Conchita’s win is a slap in the face for rising official homophobia, such as Russia’s appalling “gay propaganda laws”. In any case, Russia is smarting from the booing of its votes (though that was scarcely deserved for its 17 year old twin representatives, despite the silly connected hair and see-saw). Seems that annexation of parts of neighbouring countries does not go down well with the Eurovision crowd (though, disgracefully, it also led to the disqualification of Georgia in 2009). Ukraine, by the way, beat Russia by 24 points (and that hamster wheel is, um, clearly an excellent metaphor for the ongoing crisis). Russia came seventh, but its high position is virtually assured by a large ex-pat community in parts of Europe, and it received unusually low votes from Ukraine (4 points), Latvia (2 points) and Estonia (1 point). 

In a victory for tolerance, fun and opposition to bigotry, Conchita defiantly declared in victory that “we are united and we are unstoppable”. Indeed!

I love Conchita <3

hollyblack:

ellenkushner:

scottlynch78:

Sneaking in at the last minute, it’s a shelfie for April! What we have here (in addition to a guardian squid) is a stack of books by women who were directly or indirectly formative on my writing process before THE LIES OF LOCKE LAMORA was finished. It’s not meant to be exhaustive, just suggestive… it’s what I could easily grab from my paperback shelves in a minute or two. For instance, I forgot to grab anything by Janny Wurts, Melanie Rawn or Margaret Atwood.
Going down the column, we have:
DOOMSDAY BOOK … Connie Willis THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS … Ursula K. LeGuin WAR FOR THE OAKS … Emma Bull PARABLE OF THE TALENTS … Octavia Butler THE SNOW QUEEN … Joan Vinge THE FORGOTTEN BEASTS OF ELD … Patricia McKillip DOWNBELOW STATION … C.J. Cherryh THE WALLS OF AIR … Barbara Hambly RATS AND GARGOYLES … Mary Gentle BURNING BRIGHT … Melissa Scott THE POISON MASTER … Liz Williams THE NEMESIS FROM TERRA … Leigh Brackett MIRROR DANCE … Lois McMaster Bujold SWORDSPOINT … Ellen Kushner
I’m not a fan of Willis’ most recent work (I think BLACKOUT/ALL CLEAR is unacceptably sloppy) but DOOMSDAY BOOK is a startlingly unflinching examination of scholarship, attachment, and loss. THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS is justifiably a legend in its own time; I am also one of those weirdos who actually really likes THE DISPOSSESSED even if the subtitle “an ambiguous utopia” makes me snicker ruefully.
WAR FOR THE OAKS… where to begin? This was the city I dreamed of as a kid, lit up with magic and danger. So many of my theories on fantasy were formulated from awe of this book or in argument with it. That’s the mark of Emma’s greatness— she writes books you can have fabulous arguments with.
PARABLE OF THE TALENTS (and its predecessor PARABLE OF THE SOWER) were essential instruction for me in the art of the slightly unreliable narrator, and in helping me to realize that an author didn’t necessarily have to beam approval at everything a protagonist thought or did. As the years go by, I also find the world events described in these books to be frustratingly less and less implausible.
THE SNOW QUEEN is a big, sprawling, mythically-informed science fiction novel of the sort that’s sadly not seen very often these days.
THE FORGOTTEN BEATS OF ELD is heartbreakingly good, and started teaching me about the eventual relationship I wanted to create for Locke and Sabetha. See also OMBRIA IN SHADOW and the slightly flawed (strange tonal variations) but still rewarding RIDDLE-MASTER sequence. McKillip is a treasure.
DOWNBELOW STATION, my favorite C.J. Cherryh novel (though I’ve many yet to read). Tensely plotted conflict on cultural and character levels, showing off one of the biggest brains in science fiction.
THE WALLS OF AIR (part of the Darwath Trilogy)— interestingly enough, I’m not a complete fanboy of the Darwath books. They have some flaws I find frustrating, but those very flaws were extremely instructive to me, and the good parts are still quite good. Hambly in general is superb… DRAGONSBANE is a stone-cold classic that deserves wider fame, and THOSE WHO HUNT THE NIGHT was the book that got me into vampires in a big way in the early 90s.
RATS AND GARGOYLES— it makes no flippity-fucking sense in the final analysis, but what a glorious, phantasmagorical, mist-drenched occult cityscape it has, and what a pack of brilliantly weird characters running around in it…
BURNING BRIGHT was recommended to me in the 90s by a gaming friend. It was one of the first novels I ever read that attempted to deal in a deep and thoughtful way with the serious gaming mindset, and the art of modeling the world atmospherically/artistically as well as physically. It was also one of the first novels in which I encountered an overtly homonormative society.
THE POISON MASTER’s lush atmosphere really hit me in the last year or so before LIES coalesced from scattered notes into concrete chapters.
Leigh Brackett was the unheralded queen of the field in the early 1940s, a writer with unusually advanced narrative sensibilities that have kept her work much fresher over the decades than some of the museum pieces still nailed to the walls in the Halls of Classic SF. She was a formative practitioner of science fantasy and a deep, sympathetic thinker in an age ruled largely by the facile and the jingoistic.
In the 90s, Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga was leaping unstoppably from strength to strength, and I would argue that the MIRROR DANCE / MEMORY duet is still the highest of the sequence’s many high points.
Last but not least, SWORDSPOINT, by that damned Ellen Kushner, who floats on light and shoots genius beams out of her eyes while the rest of us are still fumbling around in the kitchen, wearing no pants, and trying to make coffee. Every field has someone like that. Ellen is ours.
Anyhow, your weekend assignment is to read all of these, and to remember that while a relatively small number of tiny-brained dickheads are making an awful lot of noise lately about how terrible it is that mere wimminses are taken seriously in the SF/F world, that’s because they’re bigots. On the inside, bigots are always frightened, grasping, desperately inadequate little creatures. They make so much noise because they can never feel sufficient in their own skins.

I think I just swooned.  Anyway, the sky went dark and Scott Lynch appeared amongst a gang of frolicking putti tossing swords and apples and roses that twined and mingled and resolved themselves into something very nice lying spread out on a table for all to enjoy.

This is a great list.

hollyblack:

ellenkushner:

scottlynch78:

Sneaking in at the last minute, it’s a shelfie for April! What we have here (in addition to a guardian squid) is a stack of books by women who were directly or indirectly formative on my writing process before THE LIES OF LOCKE LAMORA was finished. It’s not meant to be exhaustive, just suggestive… it’s what I could easily grab from my paperback shelves in a minute or two. For instance, I forgot to grab anything by Janny Wurts, Melanie Rawn or Margaret Atwood.

Going down the column, we have:

DOOMSDAY BOOK … Connie Willis
THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS … Ursula K. LeGuin
WAR FOR THE OAKS … Emma Bull
PARABLE OF THE TALENTS … Octavia Butler
THE SNOW QUEEN … Joan Vinge
THE FORGOTTEN BEASTS OF ELD … Patricia McKillip
DOWNBELOW STATION … C.J. Cherryh
THE WALLS OF AIR … Barbara Hambly
RATS AND GARGOYLES … Mary Gentle
BURNING BRIGHT … Melissa Scott
THE POISON MASTER … Liz Williams
THE NEMESIS FROM TERRA … Leigh Brackett
MIRROR DANCE … Lois McMaster Bujold
SWORDSPOINT … Ellen Kushner

I’m not a fan of Willis’ most recent work (I think BLACKOUT/ALL CLEAR is unacceptably sloppy) but DOOMSDAY BOOK is a startlingly unflinching examination of scholarship, attachment, and loss. THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS is justifiably a legend in its own time; I am also one of those weirdos who actually really likes THE DISPOSSESSED even if the subtitle “an ambiguous utopia” makes me snicker ruefully.

WAR FOR THE OAKS… where to begin? This was the city I dreamed of as a kid, lit up with magic and danger. So many of my theories on fantasy were formulated from awe of this book or in argument with it. That’s the mark of Emma’s greatness— she writes books you can have fabulous arguments with.

PARABLE OF THE TALENTS (and its predecessor PARABLE OF THE SOWER) were essential instruction for me in the art of the slightly unreliable narrator, and in helping me to realize that an author didn’t necessarily have to beam approval at everything a protagonist thought or did. As the years go by, I also find the world events described in these books to be frustratingly less and less implausible.

THE SNOW QUEEN is a big, sprawling, mythically-informed science fiction novel of the sort that’s sadly not seen very often these days.

THE FORGOTTEN BEATS OF ELD is heartbreakingly good, and started teaching me about the eventual relationship I wanted to create for Locke and Sabetha. See also OMBRIA IN SHADOW and the slightly flawed (strange tonal variations) but still rewarding RIDDLE-MASTER sequence. McKillip is a treasure.

DOWNBELOW STATION, my favorite C.J. Cherryh novel (though I’ve many yet to read). Tensely plotted conflict on cultural and character levels, showing off one of the biggest brains in science fiction.

THE WALLS OF AIR (part of the Darwath Trilogy)— interestingly enough, I’m not a complete fanboy of the Darwath books. They have some flaws I find frustrating, but those very flaws were extremely instructive to me, and the good parts are still quite good. Hambly in general is superb… DRAGONSBANE is a stone-cold classic that deserves wider fame, and THOSE WHO HUNT THE NIGHT was the book that got me into vampires in a big way in the early 90s.

RATS AND GARGOYLES— it makes no flippity-fucking sense in the final analysis, but what a glorious, phantasmagorical, mist-drenched occult cityscape it has, and what a pack of brilliantly weird characters running around in it…

BURNING BRIGHT was recommended to me in the 90s by a gaming friend. It was one of the first novels I ever read that attempted to deal in a deep and thoughtful way with the serious gaming mindset, and the art of modeling the world atmospherically/artistically as well as physically. It was also one of the first novels in which I encountered an overtly homonormative society.

THE POISON MASTER’s lush atmosphere really hit me in the last year or so before LIES coalesced from scattered notes into concrete chapters.

Leigh Brackett was the unheralded queen of the field in the early 1940s, a writer with unusually advanced narrative sensibilities that have kept her work much fresher over the decades than some of the museum pieces still nailed to the walls in the Halls of Classic SF. She was a formative practitioner of science fantasy and a deep, sympathetic thinker in an age ruled largely by the facile and the jingoistic.

In the 90s, Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan Saga was leaping unstoppably from strength to strength, and I would argue that the MIRROR DANCE / MEMORY duet is still the highest of the sequence’s many high points.

Last but not least, SWORDSPOINT, by that damned Ellen Kushner, who floats on light and shoots genius beams out of her eyes while the rest of us are still fumbling around in the kitchen, wearing no pants, and trying to make coffee. Every field has someone like that. Ellen is ours.

Anyhow, your weekend assignment is to read all of these, and to remember that while a relatively small number of tiny-brained dickheads are making an awful lot of noise lately about how terrible it is that mere wimminses are taken seriously in the SF/F world, that’s because they’re bigots. On the inside, bigots are always frightened, grasping, desperately inadequate little creatures. They make so much noise because they can never feel sufficient in their own skins.

I think I just swooned.  Anyway, the sky went dark and Scott Lynch appeared amongst a gang of frolicking putti tossing swords and apples and roses that twined and mingled and resolved themselves into something very nice lying spread out on a table for all to enjoy.

This is a great list.